Clostridium difficile. A review on an emerging infection

doi: 10.7417/CT.2019.2106

  • R. Del Prete Section of Microbiology, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine (DIM), School of Medicine, University of Bari “ Aldo Moro”, Bari - UOC Microbiology and Virology, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico of Bari, Bari
  • L. Ronga UOC Microbiology and Virology, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico of Bari, Bari
  • G. Addati Section of Microbiology, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine (DIM), School of Medicine, University of Bari “ Aldo Moro”, Bari
  • R. Magrone Section of Microbiology, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine (DIM), School of Medicine, University of Bari “ Aldo Moro”, Bari
  • A. Abbasciano Section of Microbiology, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine (DIM), School of Medicine, University of Bari “ Aldo Moro”, Bari
  • M. Decimo Section of Microbiology, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine (DIM), School of Medicine, University of Bari “ Aldo Moro”, Bari
  • G. Miragliotta Section of Microbiology, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine (DIM), School of Medicine, University of Bari “ Aldo Moro”, Bari - UOC Microbiology and Virology, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico of Bari, Bari

Abstract

Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are the toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). A third toxin, binary toxin (CDT), which pathogenetic role had been remained largely overlooked until few years ago, nowadays have been detected in 5%-23% of strains. C. difficile has spread around world. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the most common health-care associated infections and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among older adult hospitalized patients. Diagnosis of CDI is often difficult and has a substantial impact on the management of patients with disease. It is usually based on a clinical history of recent antimicrobial usage and diarrhoea in combination with laboratory tests. Although the conventional methods are crucial for the diagnosis and the subsequent treatment of CDI, a timely laboratory diagnosis is essential for the detection of toxigenic strains providing either to an effective and  immediately treatment or to the prevention of further disease transmission.


In this review we provide general recommendations for testing of samples collected from patients with suspected CDI

Published
2019-02-14
How to Cite
DEL PRETE, R. et al. Clostridium difficile. A review on an emerging infection. La Clinica Terapeutica, [S.l.], v. 1, n. 170, p. e41 - e47, feb. 2019. ISSN 1972-6007. Available at: <http://www.clinicaterapeutica.it/ojs/index.php/ClinicaTerapeutica/article/view/342>. Date accessed: 25 aug. 2019.